Category Archives: Authors

Holiday Book Magazine

Hop on over to my Page “Holiday Magazine” and see the information I need if you wish to have your book(s) listed in the 2017 Holiday Gift Magazine I will be sending to all my newsletter subscribers.

If you participate by having your book(s) in the magazine, I will give you a pdf file of the magazine to share with your newsletter subscribers.

This is a great way to promote your book(s) FREE of charge…well, you will need to spend a little bit of time getting me the information for the magazine then sending it out to your readers.

The more that participate the more circulation your books will have!

And, I will feature a book a day on this blog throughout the Holiday Season!

 

 

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St. John’s Bible

I work in Special Collections at Kansas State University.  A few years ago, someone donated a set of St. John’s Bible for the department to share with the community.

Docents take these large Bibles out to the community to allow folks to look and touch them.

You can watch a short video with Donald Jackson, Calligrapher, about the St. John’s Bible here.

There are several videos on YouTube about the St. John’s Bible project.

“In the Beginning – Creating the Saint John’s Bible”

And if you have time to watch a longer video with Father Eric Hollas.

Eric Hollas, O. S. B.: Text and Pen: The Legacy of Biblical Art and The Saint John’s Bible

“Donald Jackson  and his team of scribes and artists have combined ancient calligraphic techniques with computer technology to create on calf-skin vellum the first hand-written and hand-illuminated bible commissioned in over 500 years.”

Learn more at Saint John’s Bible.

 

 

 

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Filed under Authors, Books, Genre, Non-Fiction

Spooktacular Giveaway Hop

A month of spooks, goblins and ghost stories.

I am participating in BookHounds “Spooktacular Giveaway Hop” starting today, October 15 and going through to midnight on Halloween night.

To enter my giveaway, sign-up for my newsletter at the link below.  If you are already signed up for my newsletter, leave a comment or click “Like.”

(Note- I value my privacy and I will value yours.  I will never trade, sell, or give away your email address.)

Sign-up for my newsletter, Cindy’s Notebook:

http://eepurl.com/cZ-FiD 

 

The Adventures of Holly Holstein: Holly Greets the World

By: Jim Shroyer

About the Book:

It is Grandma Helen’s birthday and the family has come for a visit. Mika wants to see a newborn calf. When a calf is born, Farmer Tom shows Mika how to feed the calf. Once the calf is nice and warm, Mika asks to name the calf. Most farmers don’t name their cows, but Farmer Tom agrees to name the calf Holly.

 

The Kansas City Establishment: Leadership through Two Centuries in a Midwestern Metropolis

By: Richard P. Coleman

About the Book:

Through the one-hundred years of its existence, Kansas City’s Establishment has maintained its leadership standing by absorbing into its ranks those newly rising men and women judged most valuable for their potential contribution. This differs markedly from the policies of closed aristocracy attributed by social scientists and novelists to the tiptop strata in the older cities of the East and South, Boston and Philadelphia for example.  Comparatively, Kansas City’s Establishment world has been dynamic and democratic.

 

To celebrate Halloween, I am giving away a cozy mystery.

The Cat Who Could Read Backwards

By: Lilian Jackson Braun

About the Book:

The world of modern art is a mystery to many. But for Jim Qwilleran, it turns into a mystery of another sort when his assignment to the art beat for The Daily Fluxion leads down the path to murder. A stabbing in an art gallery, vandalized paintings, a fatal fall from a scaffolding–this is not at all what Qwilleran expects when he turns his reportorial talents to art. But Qwilleran and his newly found partner, Koko the brilliant Siamese, are back in their element–sniffing out clues and confounding criminals intent on mayhem and murder.

 

Don’t forget to sign-up for my newsletter.

http://eepurl.com/cZ-FiD

If you have already signed up for my newsletter, leave a comment below or click “Like” to be entered in the giveaway.

 

This Spooktacular Giveaway Hop is Hosted by Bookhounds

Click here to see a list of other participating in the Giveaway Hop.

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Filed under Authors, Books, Children's Books, Genre, Halloween, Non-Fiction

Brief Review, Ice Blue by Anne Stuart

Ice Blue
By: Anne Stuart
Publisher: Mira
Publication Date: 2007

Brief Review:

Anne Stuart has created a story that should be on the silver screen.  With well-developed characters, fast-moving plot, and an exotic location, this could be a movie similar to the James Bond films.

Ice Blue is the third book in the Ice Series.

Hana Hayashi hid a Japanese ice-blue ceramic bowl in the care of her charge, Summer Hawthrone, a museum curator.  After Hana Hayashi was killed in an accident the bowl held great sentimental value for Summer.  The bowl, a ceremonial kimono, and a handmade kimono were all that Summer had left of Hana.

Lianne Lovitz promised the bowl to the leader of the True Realization Fellowship without asking her daughter and Summer was bound and determined the man wouldn’t get it.  What she didn’t know was there were more than just the True Realization Fellowship after the bowl and both sides were ready to kill for it.

After a museum exhibit which featured the ice-blue bowl, Summer is kidnapped then rescued by Takashi O’Brien, an international operative for The Committee.  His orders were clear, keep the bowl out of the hands of the True Realization Fellowship and kill anyone who knew the whereabouts of the Hayashi mystical location.  Did Summer know the whereabouts of this location?  Takashi thought so.

 

Author Bio: (From author’s Amazon page)

I’ve been writing since the dawn of time. A child prodigy, I made my first professional sale to Jack and Jill Magazine at the age of 7, for which I received $25 (admittedly my father worked for the publisher). Since then I’ve written gothics, regencies, romantic suspense, historical romance, series romance — anything with sex and violence, love and redemption. I misbehave frequently but somehow have managed to amass lots of glittering prizes, like NYT, PW and USA Today bestseller status, Lifetime Achievement Award from the Romance Writers of America, and a decent smattering of Romantic times and RITA awards.

I live on a lake in Northern Vermont with my incredibly fabulous husband. My two children have flown the coop, but the three cats do their best to keep us from being lonely.

In my spare time I quilt and play around with wearable art, and the rest of the time I write write write. Apparently, women of a certain age get a rush of creativity, and I’m currently enjoying it. Too many stories to write, not enough hours in the day.

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Filed under Authors, Book Reviews, Books, Fiction, Genre, Mystery, Romance, Suspense, Travel

Review of The Good Spy by Kai Bird

The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames
By: Kai Bird
Publisher: Broadway Books
Publication Date: May 26, 2015

 

Brief Review:

I was military, stationed in Germany in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  I do not remember how many times my company was on high alert.  There were threats coming from the Middle East, especially on November 4, 1979, when a group of Iranian students stormed the U. S. Embassy in Tehran, taking more than 60 American hostages.  The rescue attempt on April 24, 1980, known as Operation Eagle Claw, failed, resulting in the accidental deaths of eight American servicemen and one Iranian civilian, as well as the destruction of two helicopters.  The hostages were held captive for 444 days.  They were released on January 20, 1981, minutes after Ronald Reagan was sworn in as President of the United States.  This was only one incident that took place during “Peacetime” or during the “Cold War.”  Personally, I didn’t see “Peacetime” so peaceful.  We could have gone to war at any given time.  I had all of this on my mind as I read The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames by Kai Bird.

Robert Ames was a CIA Operative who died in the bombing of the American Embassy in Beirut on April 18, 1983. He was one of 63 people killed that day of which 17 were Americans.

What does Bird’s title, The Good Spy mean?  Ames worked hard and he was a devoted family man.  He appeared to be a kind and decent man who had a thirst for Middle East knowledge: he learned Arabic and learned about the history and culture of each area he was stationed at.  He made friends, not just contacts.  Ames was somewhat of a rogue who operated independently and didn’t always see eye to eye with his fellow operatives. Yet, he was “good” at his job.

The Good Spy, in my opinion, is best read in small chunks so that the reader can get to know Ames and all the many players, movers and shakers of the Middle East.   Bird does an excellent job with an overview history of the Middle East and the role that Ames played in that history.

This book left me with this question: If Robert Ames had lived beyond 1983, would the course of history, especially in the Middle East, been changed?

 

Listen to an interview between Kai Bird and Charlie Rose at:

https://kaibird.com

 

About the Author: (from Amazon)

Kai Bird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and biographer. His new book is The Good Spy: The Life and Death of Robert Ames. A biography of a CIA officer, The Good Spy was released on May 20, 2014, by Crown/Random House. Kai’s last book was a memoir about the Middle East entitled Crossing Mandelbaum Gate: Coming of Age Between the Arabs and Israelis, 1956-1978 (Scribner, April 27, 2010). It was a 2011 Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography. He is the co-author with Martin J. Sherwin of the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer (2005), which also won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography and the Duff Cooper Prize for History in London. He wrote The Chairman: John J. McCloy, the Making of the American Establishment (1992) and The Color of Truth: McGeorge Bundy & William Bundy, Brothers in Arms (1998). He is also co-editor with Lawrence Lifschultz of Hiroshima’s Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy (1998). He is the recipient of fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Alicia Patterson Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s writing fellowship, the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, the German Marshall Fund, the Rockefeller Foundation’s Study Center, Bellagio, Italy and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC. He is a member of the Society of American Historians and a contributing editor of The Nation. He lives in Miami Beach.

 

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Filed under Authors, Awards, Books, Genre, Non-Fiction

“Hometown Appetites: She Served Up Americana (With a Side Dish of Quirk)”

Today is Clementine Paddleford’s birthday.  If she were alive today she would be 119 years old!

 

“Hometown Appetites: She Served Up Americana (With a Side Dish of Quirk)”
By: Benjamin Schmerler

Clementine Paddleford wrote, “We all have home-town appetites.  Every other person is a bundle of longing for the simplicities of good taste once enjoyed on the farm or in the home they left behind.”

Benjamin Schmerler of the New York Post wrote, “If the food writer Clementine Paddleford were alive today, she would have at least two Food Network shows (one devoted to cooking, a second to travel), a weekly newspaper column, a cookbook series and, of course, a blog.  Or so it is easy to imagine by reading Kelly Alexander and Cynthia Harris’s smartly drawn, surprising uplifting biography ‘Hometown Appetites'”.

Schmerler continues, “Thankfully, the authors share Paddleford’s eye for a good story, deftly documenting their subject’s well-deserved contributions to food journalism, but balancing them with biographical color.”

 

 

Don’t forget to sign up for my newsletter and be entered into a giveaway drawing. Giveaway ends, September 30.

http://eepurl.com/cZ-FiD

Giving away a signed hardback copy of Hometown Appetites; a $20 Amazon Gift Card; and a paperback copy of A Flower for My Mother.

 

 

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Filed under Authors, Book Reviews, Books, Genre, Non-Fiction

128 Words with Senses that Started out as Underworld Slang

This list of words is good for writers writing about the mob/mafia and want to use the correct wordage for the time period.

**********

From Daily Writing Tips, August 10, 2017

The slang senses of many words we use in conversation and in informal writing originated in jargon employed by criminals, often coined to disguise the activities they were describing when they spoke among one another. This post lists and defines a number of those words.

action: bet, or betting, or criminal activity
aggro: aggressive behavior
angle: approach, or plan
bananas: crazy (originally, “sexually perverted”)
beat: escape, avoid
beef: quarrel
blow: leave
boob: stupid person
boost: steal
bought: bribed
break it up: stop argument or fight
broad: woman
buddy: man (as in addressing a person the speaker does not know)
bum’s rush: act of being forcibly removed
bump/bump off: kill
bunk: nonsense
buy: bribe
case: check the site of a potential robbery
chisel: cheat
clam up: stop talking, or refuse to talk, to avoid giving information
con: scheme to trick someone into relinquishing money
con man: person who steals through trickery
cop/copper: police officer or private detective
crew: group of rank-and-file criminals subordinate to a leader; by extension, a group of people with whom one associates
crumb: worthless person; originally, a noncriminal
deep-six: bury
dive: low-quality establishment, such as a dark, dingy bar
doll: attractive woman
dope: drugs, or information
dough: money
dump: see dive
Feds: federal law-enforcement personnel
fence: trade stolen items, or one who does so
finger: identify
fix: situation in which law-enforcement personnel have been bribed to overlook criminal activity
fruit: homosexual (derogatory)
fuzz: police
glom: steal (by extension, “grab”)
go straight: cease criminal activity
goofy: crazy (by extension, “silly”)
goon: low-level criminal
graft: see con
grand: thousand (dollars)
grease: see buy
grill: interrogate
grifter: see “con man”
haywire: mentally unbalanced
heat: attention from law-enforcement personnel, or a gun (by extension, “psychological pressure”)
heel: an incompetent criminal (by extension, “a villain or someone who takes on a villainous persona or role,” as in professional wrestling)
hit: planned murder (by extension, “an attack on someone’s reputation”)
hood(lum): see goon
horn: telephone
hot: stolen
hype: cheat by short-changing, or hypodermic needle
jam: trouble, or a troublesome situation
jaw: talk
joe: coffee
joint: place
junkie: drug user
keister: buttocks, or a safe
kisser: mouth
knock off: see bump/“bump off”
knock over: rob
large: see grand
lay low: remain out of sight so as to avoid attention after committing a crime
legit: pertaining to legal business activities
lit: drunk
loan shark: one who loans money at high rates of interest
looker: see doll
lug: stupid person (by extension, “clumsy person”—often used affectionately and jocularly)
mark: person targeted to be a victim of criminal activity
marker: IOU, note acknowledging a debt
mitt: hand
muscle: force, or intimidate, or someone who forces or intimidates
mug: face
nail: capture
nick: steal
nix: no, or say no to something
on the carpet: situation in which a criminal is called on the carpet, or disciplined, by a leader (by extension, pertains to any similar event)
on the lam: moving secretly to avoid arrest after committing a crime
on the spot: targeted for assassination (by extension, pertaining to being held accountable for a failure or mistake)
packing heat: armed with a gun
patsy: person framed for a crime (by extension, “fool”)
paw: hand
piece: share of the proceeds from criminal activity (see action), or a gun
pig: police officer
pinch: arrest
pop: see bump/“bump off”
punk: see goon (originally, a submissive homosexual)
put the screws on: see grill
queer: counterfeit
rap: criminal charge
rat: give information about associates’ criminal activities to law-enforcement personnel, or someone who does so
ringer: fake
rub out: see bump/“bump off”
rube: easy victim
sap: stupid person
score: succeed in obtaining stolen money or goods
scram: see blow
scratch: money
sing: see rat (verb)
skip out: leave without paying
skirt: woman
slug: punch, or knock unconscious, or a bullet
snatch: kidnap
sock: punch
spill: see rat (verb), or talk (verb)
square: honest
stiff: corpse
sting: see con (by extension, “a law-enforcement operation to prompt and observe criminal behavior”)
stir: jail
stir-crazy: mentally disturbed because of incarceration
stool pigeon/stoolie: see rat (noun)
straighten out: resolve a dispute
string along: deceive
sucker: see rube
swag: stolen goods (by extension, “gifts offered to promote through publicity”)
tag: designation (by extension, “graffiti signature”)
tail: track a criminal’s activities, or a law-enforcement official who does so
take: share of profits from criminal activity
take a powder: leave
take (someone) for a ride: see bump/“bump off”
take the fall: be targeted for blame for a crime
tighten the screws: pressure
trap: see kisser
two bits: twenty-five cents
vendetta: vow of vengeance (by extension, “a passionate, sustained effort to avenge oneself or one’s family or group”)
yap: see kisser

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Filed under Authors, Books, Crime Fiction, Genre, Murder Mystery, Mystery, Writing

Old Empty Houses

Old Empty Houses
By Cynthia Harris

I would love to tell my story
But I don’t know how,
My owners left me forlorn
And some burn me down.
Yet I have lots of stories to tell.
My original owners were proud,
The day the first foundation stone was laid.
They looked forward to having
A new roof over their head,
And to the family they had.
But now they’re gone
And other family members
Have abandoned me
And I’m just
Waiting for my death.

© 2009 by Cynthia Harris

Photography copyrighted to Joe Harris, 2009

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Filed under Authors, Genre, poetry

Authors do research to

My favorite places to do research are in archives, historical societies, and libraries.

Whether you are a writer of non-fiction or fiction, research is probably a part of your writing.  And it is always good to have extra funds when researching.

There are many fellowships available to individuals and here are the ones from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) for 2018.

If you apply for one of these fellowships and get it, let me know and you can do a guest blog post here on Cindy’s Notebook.

 

2018 UCLA Library Special Collections Short-term Research Fellowships

http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/short-term-research-fellowships

The UCLA Library Special Collections Research Fellowships Program supports the use of special collections materials by visiting scholars and UCLA graduate students. Collections that are administered by UCLA Library Special Collections and available for fellowship-supported research include rare books, journals, manuscripts, archives, printed ephemera, photographs and other audiovisual materials, oral history interviews, and other items in the humanities and social sciences; medical, life and physical sciences; visual and performing arts; and UCLA history.

The Fellowships

James and Sylvia Thayer Short-term Research Fellowships

Thayer fellowships provide support for research in any collections administered by UCLA Library Special Collections. Stipends range from $500 to $2,500 and vary yearly; grants in 2016 averaged $1,770 and in 2017 averaged $1,500. Awards are funded by an endowment established by longtime UCLA benefactors James and Sylvia Thayer.

Barbara Rootenberg Short-term Research Fellowship in the History of Medicine and the Life Sciences

The Rootenberg fellowship promotes the use of materials in History & Special Collections for the Sciences in UCLA Library Special Collections. One annual fellowship is awarded in the amount of $1,000. The award is named for Barbara Rootenberg, an alumna of the UCLA School of Library Service and an internationally-renowned antiquarian bookseller.

Kenneth Karmiole Endowed Research Fellowship in UCLA Library Special Collections

The Karmiole fellowship supports the use of UCLA Library Special Collections materials by visiting scholars and graduate students. One annual fellowship will be awarded in the amount of $5,000 to allow scholars to pursue research lasting from one to three months. The award is funded by an endowment established by Kenneth Karmiole, an internationally-renowned antiquarian bookseller who earned his master’s degree in library science from UCLA in 1971. Information and application details are available at http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/karmiole-fellowships .

R.B. Kitaj Fellowship

The Kitaj fellowship will allow scholars to pursue research lasting up to two months in UCLA Library Special Collections. One fellowship will be awarded in the amount of $2,500. The R.B. Kitaj Research Fellowship award is funded by the R.B. Kitaj Studio Project, a non-profit dedicated to promoting the legacy of American painter R.B. Kitaj (1932-2007). The fellowship was initiated to encourage research into and creative work inspired by Kitaj, an internationally renowned painter and intellectual. Born in Ohio, Kitaj spent much of his career in London, where he was a key participant in what is known as the “School of London.” He spent the last decade of his life in Los Angeles. In addition to a rich body of artwork, Kitaj left behind a large collection of papers and musings, now housed at UCLA Library Special Collections in the Charles E. Young Research Library. Kitaj Research Fellow awardees are expected to be in residence at UCLA Library Special Collections and to make use of the R.B. Kitaj Papers (Collection 1741). Information and application details are available at http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/kitaj-fellowships

Ahmanson Research Fellowships for the Study of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Books

Ahmanson Fellowships support the use of medieval and Renaissance monographic and manuscript holdings in UCLA Library Special Collections: the Ahmanson-Murphy Collection of the Aldine Press; the Ahmanson-Murphy Collection of Early Italian Printing; the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana; the Orsini Family Papers; the Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Collection; the Richard and Mary Rouse Collection of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and Early Printed Books; and the Medieval and Renaissance Arabic and Persian Medical Manuscripts. The fellowships provide $2,500 per month for up to three months. Administered by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, this program requires an application separate from that for Thayer, Rootenberg, Karmiole, and Kitaj fellowships, and delivered to a different address; information is available on the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Center’s website athttp://www.cmrs.ucla.edu/awards-fellowships/ahmanson/ .

Eligibility

Thayer and Rootenberg Fellowships:  United States citizens and permanent residents with the legal right to work in the U.S. who are engaged in graduate-level, post-doctoral, academic, or independent research are invited to apply. Research residencies may last up to three months between January 3 and December 15, 2018.

Karmiole Fellowships:  United States citizens and permanent residents with the legal right to work in the U.S. who are engaged in graduate-level, post-doctoral, academic, or independent research are invited to apply. Research residencies may last from one to three months between January 3 and December 15, 2018.  Information and application details are available at:  http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/karmiole-fellowships

 Kitaj Fellowships:  United States citizens and permanent residents with the legal right to work in the U.S. who are engaged in graduate-level, post-doctoral, academic, or independent research are invited to apply. Research residencies may last from one to three months between January 3 and August 31, 2018.  Information and application details are available at:  http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/kitaj-fellowships

 Ahmanson Fellowships:  United States and international graduate students or scholars holding a PhD (or the foreign equivalent) who are engaged in graduate-level, postdoctoral, or independent research are invited to apply. Applications are due March 1, 2018; research residencies may last up to three months between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019. Information and application details are available at: http://www.cmrs.ucla.edu/awards-fellowships/ahmanson/ .

Application Contents and Instructions for Thayer and Rootenberg Fellowships

Researchers can submit a single application for “Short-term Research Fellowships” in order to be considered for either the Thayer or Rootenberg fellowships. Applications must be received on or before November 1, 2017.

Applications must include:

·         Cover letter

·         Curriculum vitae

·         Outline of research topic and special collections to be used (two pages maximum)

·         Brief budget for travel, living, and research expenses

·         Dates to be spent in residence

·         Two letters of recommendation from faculty or other scholars familiar with the research project. Please note that the committee cannot consider letters of recommendation from librarians or staff of the UCLA Library.

Application materials for the Thayer and Rootenberg Fellowships, including letters of recommendation, may be submitted in PDF format by email to lib_lscfellowships@library.ucla.edu .  Letters of recommendation in PDF format can also be sent by email, either by the person writing them or by the applicant.

 Review Process and Notification

A committee will evaluate the research proposals, and applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by email on or before December 1, 2017.  Fellows may be asked to speak briefly about their recent or ongoing research at an informal brownbag session with local scholars during their visit.

Contact Information

Submit applications or direct questions about fellowships to:

Short-term Research Fellowships Program

UCLA Library Special Collections

A1713 Charles E. Young Research Library

Box 951575

Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575

Phone:     310.825.6940

Email:     lib_lscfellowships@library.ucla.edu

 Web:  http://www.library.ucla.edu/special-collections/short-term-research-fellowships

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Filed under Authors, Fiction, Genre, Non-Fiction

And the Winners Are!

All winners have been notified and the books are on their way!

Congratulations to:

 

Janice J. is the winner of Hometown Appetites!  Hope you enjoy learning about Clementine Paddleford and trying out some of the recipes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He wrote me a note saying that he too had a nose for justice!  The winner of A Nose for Justice is James W.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Z. is the winner of A Flower for My Mother. 

The stories in this book are fun for both young and old.

 

 

 

 

 

The winner of Both Sides of Nice is Helen R.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to everyone who participated in this giveaway.

The next giveaway is Banned Book Week Giveaway, September 15-30.  Again this is a hop that I am participating via bookhounds.net

 

 

 

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Filed under Authors, Biography, Books, Cookbooks, Fiction, Genre, Memoir, Mystery, Recipes