Category Archives: Books

Having a tracheal tube never stopped her…

Recently, I presented at the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, Topeka, Kansas, on Clementine Paddleford.

At the end of the presentation, I answered questions.  Most of the questions I have been asked before.  But, one question got me to thinking…”Why don’t you focus more on the fact that Paddleford had a tracheal tube and how hard it must have been for her to do her job with it?”

I do mention in my presentation that Paddleford had throat cancer and elected for a partial surgery so that she could continue to talk with a tracheal tube.  I also talk about how hard of time she had re-learning to talk and getting used to the tube.  It took her a year with many trips back and forth to the hospital and dealing with pain.  The tube was held in place with a velvet ribbon.

Paddleford, herself, stated that because of the raspy whisper of her voice caused by the tracheal tube “people remember me.”  She also said that the only things she couldn’t do, that she liked to do, was to play tennis and go swimming.  Because of the tracheal tube she could not go on lecture circuit, the radio, or television.  These are some reasons, she is largely forgotten about today.  Otherwise, the tracheal tube never got in her way of doing what she loved: being a journalist-food writer.  Paddleford traveled wherever she wanted to go, interviewed whomever she wanted to interview, wrote about them, turned in her receipts, and got paid.

So, who is Clementine Paddleford?  She is the best known food editor, you never heard of.

December 28, 1953, Time Magazine declared Clementine Paddleford, “the best known food editor in the U. S.”

Here is the program from the Wilder Society Tea where I presented.  They put together this booklet because they wanted to share the recipes of the food served at the tea with those in attendance.  Recipes are from Paddleford’s 1960 book How America Eats.

Note, if you decide to make these recipes, remember they are from 1948 to 1960, and they are not as sweet as desserts are today.  So, if you are looking to cut back on sugar, but still want a dessert, use one of the recipes below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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When people see me, what do they think?

I had an opportunity to attend a Leadership Seminar recently.  The keynote speaker, Rhett Laubach, opened his presentation with this question:  “When people see me, what do they think?”

A little bit further into his presentation he repeated the question: “When people see me, what do they think?”  Then he took it one step further, and said, “Whatever they think, is my fault.”

The theme for the seminar was “Inclusive, Impactful, and Ethical Leadership.”

To break the ice, Laubach used music to create community because music tell stories.  Try it, you will see for yourself that it works.  It is very “impactful.”

What do you feel when you hear this music?

Everyone in the seminar immediately held up their hands to present baby Simba, because “He Lives in You.”

I learned many things and many things were reinforced during this seminar.

Thinking of the above song, ask yourself this, “Who can do their job better because they had me in their life?”

If you get the chance to attend a Leadership Seminar, I encourage you to do so.

“Leaders have to be learners.” ~ Kevin Ingram, President Manhattan Christian College (Ingram was one of the breakout session presenters).

 

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Ancestors

Recently, someone asked if I would ever write a historical novel using one of my ancestors.  I answered, yes, if I had any that were colorful.

If any of you do genealogy, then you know how frustrating it can be to do research on your ancestors.  If you are lucky enough to have had someone do the research for you, thank your lucky stars!

One of my great-grandfathers seems to have been born under that cabbage leaf you hear so much about.  Where I grew up when children asked where did babies come from they were told that babies were found under a cabbage leaf.

Yep, Jacob was born under a cabbage leaf.

There is no other explanation for it!

Ancestory.com has no birth record for Jacob.  None of the Census records show his parents’ name.  Nowhere have I found where he was born.

Here is what I know about my ancestor, Jacob.

  • He fought in the American Revolutionary War.
  • He deserted while a soldier in the American Revolutionary War for a Pennsylvania Regiment.  This was not uncommon, as many soldiers did.
  • When he deserted he was headed for Hagerstown, Maryland.
  • Her married, Jane, however, I cannot find a marriage record and have only been able to guess her last name, which is not a “fact.”
  • Jacob and Jane moved to Tennessee.
  • I have found their children’s names.
  • I found Jacob’s and Jane’s death dates.

As with any family, there are stories – which most I have found not to be true.

So, to go back to the beginning – would I write a novel about one of my ancestor…I guess if I ever did, I could always write a historical novel involving Jacob’s parents since I know absolutely nothing about them.  That way, I could really write a historical fiction novel and know for a solid fact that is was pure fiction.

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Parisa by Conrad Trump, a Virtual Book Tour

Parisa by Conrad Trump

Parisa by Conrad Trump

Publisher:  High Peaks Publishing (September 7, 2015)
Category: Contemporary Fiction, Adventure, Fantasy, Paranormal, Urban Fantasy
Tour dates: Mar/Apr, 2018
ISBN: 978-0976159766
Available in Print and ebook,292 pages
Parisa

 

Guest Post Review by Laura R: 5 Stars

If you love to get lost in a book, you need to read Parisa by Conrad Trump!  The lead character, Scott is in a horrible snowboarding accident.  He then unknowingly releases a century-old spirit.  Her name is Parisa.  Sure, she can grant wishes so it may remind you of the old television show, I Dream Of Genie’ but this has so much more depth to it.  Scott is left with the responsibility of helping Parisa fit into today’s society which is no easy task.  To top that off, he starts to have romantic feelings for her.

This book is well written and full of both drama and humor.  Even though it is fairly short, the characters are well drawn out.  As I was reading it, I felt like I was there in a real place with real people.  I think it would make a great movie! This is book one in a series and I can hardly wait to read book two!  I recommend Parisa for fantasy and adventure readers.  I give it 5 stars!

Book Excerpt:

“What are the X Games?” Parisa asked.

“The X Games are the pinnacle of extreme sports. Athletes from all over the world meet every year and test their skill against one another. I snowboard on the half-pipe.”

“I don’t understand,” Parisa confessed.

“Do you see these boards?” Scott asked, leading her to the wall opposite the front bay window. A pair of silver medals was mounted under the neon-green Burton snowboard splashed with blue paint. Beside the board was a matted picture of Scott rising out of the pipe. His board was pointing upward, and he was holding the tip of it with one hand. His matching green parka looked as if it was speckled with the falling snow. In the pictures, he wore dark goggles and a neon-green helmet. “That’s me,” Scott said, pointing to the picture. “I came in second that day.”

“I have only just seen snow for the first time,” Parisa told him, looking fondly at the photograph.

“The day I released you. I saw you near the ribbon cutting at the bottom of the slope.”

“I wasn’t strong enough yet to stay separated from my vessel for more than a few seconds, but it was long enough to see you and snow for the first time.”

“You had never seen snow before?”

“No, my Scott. I had always wanted to, but I was forbidden to leave the palace.”

“Well, honey, you are looking at the King of the Snow,” Scott said, puffing up his chest. “It’s a shame that we’re in San Diego. There’s no snow here, but when I go back to Lake Placid next week, you’ll see lots of snow—if you want to come with me, that is.”

“Of course I will come with you. You are my Scott.”

“I’ll teach you to snowboard. I would take you today, but”—Scott shrugged his shoulders— “no snow.”

“Would my Scott like it to snow?” Parisa asked, raising her arms above her head. Suddenly the lights in the house dimmed as a heavy cloud cover rolled in from the ocean, west of Coronado. There was a rumbling of thunder, and the windows shook. Scott could feel the barometric pressure sinking around him as he stood there in wonder.

Scott grabbed her arms and gently lowered them to her sides. “It can’t snow here, Parisa. This is San Diego.”

As soon as he said it, the world became a little lighter. The clouds just beginning to form over the city dissipated.

“Could you really have made it snow?” Scott asked.

Parisa smiled knowingly. “If my Scott had wished it,” she answered.

Scott laughed, but the display of power frightened him. It was one thing to float a box of roses. It was another to change the West Coast’s weather pattern. He was humbled by the scope of her magic. It was truly unsettling, but the Locke smile never faltered. He continued to chuckle and shake his head.

“I could take us someplace where there is snow,” Parisa suggested. “Would that be better?”

“What do you mean, ‘take us’?” Scott asked, uncertain that he was ready for the answer.

“Give me your hand, my Scott, think of where you would like to be—someplace snowy, someplace tropical, someplace on a beach—and we will go.”

“You can do that?” Scott asked. “Anyplace?”

“Anyplace,” Parisa assured him.

Scott thought about it for just a second. He smiled and whispered, “I know just the spot.” He took Parisa by the hands. The world jumped sideways. He fell forward without ever leaving his feet. For a moment they were one, traveling not hand in hand but spirit in spirit, moving through the ether at the top of the world. He felt neither warmth nor coolness, and there was no pain. They were slipping through the coil of known science, pushing back against the realities of time and matter. He was free in a way that his greatest, highest jumps had never come close to reaching.

He barely remembered the lingering morphine-induced dreams of floating on his snowboard after surgery. Traveling through space and time now was just like those dreams. He was floating, and he was free—only this time, he was not alone. His essence was entwined with Parisa’s, and together they soared untethered like snowflakes in a blizzard.

Praise for Parisa:

“Parisa held my interest and was hard to put down. I enjoyed it and can’t wait for Conrad to write another story. I believe Parisa would make a good movie!”- Debbie Moore, Reviewer

“I read Conrad’s book in less than three days. Not only is it a good story, but anyone from West Virginia will love the way Conrad blended our home state into the story about a West Virginia native who becomes a world-class snowboarder. This gave us native mountaineers a great deal to be proud of not only with the West Virginia setting, but knowing our native son has developed into a great writer.
I look forward to reading more stories written by Conrad in the future. I loved the book.”-KC Bohrer, Reviewer

“What an excellent book! This book keeps you hanging until you get to the next page. An excellent read by an excellent author! I am looking forward to reading future books by this author! Excellent word choice provides vivid pictures throughout the story. Excellent storyline.”- Meredith L. Zirkleml, Reviewer

About Conrad Trump:Parisa by Conrad Trump

Conrad Trump was raised in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, where he still resides.  He received a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from West Virginia University and a master’s degree in Special Education from Old Dominion University.

Conrad has worked with youth, guiding troubled teens for the past quarter of a century at a residential school outside of Winchester, Virginia.

Prior to the publication of Parisa, Conrad had dozens of shorter pieces of fiction published in magazines and anthologies.  In addition to writing, he is an award-winning and published artist with his paintings featured in national juried exhibitions.  Conrad is also an accomplished and published photographer.  He is an outdoor enthusiast and an avid supporter of all things West Virginia.  He and his wife, Kim, have been married for twenty-five years.  Together they have two children, Hilary and Shaun.

Website: http://conradtrump.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/conrad.trump

*****

Where to Purchase the Book:

Amazon
Barnes&Noble
BookDepository

Giveaway Parisa by Conrad Trump

This giveaway is for one print copy or ebook copy of the book.  Print is available to the U.S. only but ebook is available worldwide.  This giveaway ends on April 30, 2018.  Entries are accepted via Rafflecopter only.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Parisa by Conrad Trump

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Filed under Authors, book blitz, Book Reviews, Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Genre, Paranormal Urban Fantasy

LibraryThing – Store a list of your books in a safe place

Do you have a huge library?  Would you like to have a list of your in the cloud where you would not have to worry if a disaster happens and the insurance company asked for a list of books before they would process your claim? Then put your books in LibraryThing.

LibraryThing is FREE for a personal account of up to 200 books.  Or, enter as many as you like for $10 per year or, the best way to go, $25 for life.

Once you have a LibraryThing account you can add your books from Amazon and import all the information about that book – book cover, ISBN, etc.

And if a disaster happens, you have a list of all your books stored safely outside your home.

Now, if you would like for your library to show up in an online catalog, then you would also need to purchase an account in TinyCat.  TinyCat prices vary depending on the total number of books you have.

 

 

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Brief Timeline of Printing 1970-2011

This is a continuation of the Brief Timeline that began on January 26, 2018, that continued on February 2, 2018, and this is the last blog on the timeline of printing.

1970: Water-based ink introduced.

1972: Thermal printing developed.

1977: The Compugraphic EditWriter 7500 phototypesetter introduced.

1981: Microsoft Disk Operating System introduced.

1982: Adobe Systems Inc. founded.

1983: Desktop publishing appears.

1984: Apple Macintosh personal computer introduced.

1984: 3D printing developed.

1985: Microsoft Windows introduced.

1985: PostScript typesetting language introduced.

1985: Apple LaserWriter desktop printer introduced.

1985: PageMaker desktop publishing introduced.

1987: Soy-based ink appears.

1987: QuarkXPress desktop publishing program introduced.

1988: Adobe Photoshop raster graphics editor introduced.

1990: Xerox DocuTech. Production-publishing system that allowed paper documents to be scanned, electronically edited, and then printed on demand.

1991: TrueType scalable computer introduced.

1991: Heidelberg and Presstek introduced GTO-DI, the first plate making on the press.

1993: Indigo digital color printer introduced.

1993: Portable Document Format (PDF) introduced.

1996: OpenType scalable computer fonts introduced.

1999: InDesign desktop publishing program introduced.

2011: The Saint John’s Bible is the first completely handwritten and illustrated Bible since the invention of the printing press.

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Brief Timeline of Printing from 618-1800

Today when we want to print something, we usually create a document on our laptop computer, save it, and send it to the printer, and out spits a sheet of paper with the words we typed on the document.

It wasn’t always that way.

Here is a brief timeline of printing:

618 to 906: T’ang Dynasty-the first printing done in China using ink on carved wooden blocks begins to make multiple transfers of an image to paper.

1241: Koreans print books using movable type.

1300: The first use of wooden movable type in China.

1309: Europeans first make paper.  However, the Chinese and Egyptians had started making paper centuries previous.

1338: First papermill opened in France.

1377: Common screw press used to print text cut from single blocks of wood.

1390: First papermill opened in Germany.

1392: Foundries that can produce bronze type are opened in Korea.

1423: In Europe, block printing is used to print books.

1452: In Europe, metal plates are first used in printing.

1452: Gutenberg begins printing the Bible which he finishes in 1456.

1457: First color printing by Fust and Schoeffer.

1465: Drypoint engravings invented by Germans.

1476: William Caxton begins using a Gutenberg printing press in England

1477: Intaglio is first used for book illustration.

1495; First papermill opened in England.

1501: Italic type first used.

1530: Claude Garamond designs a Roman typeface in Paris.

1611: King James Bible published.

1660: Mezzotint invented in Germany.

1691: First papermill opened in the American colonies.

1702: Multi-colored engraving invented.

1725: In Scotland stereotyping invented by William Ged.

1800: Iron printing presses invented.

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Chaos – Can’t Have Anyone Over Syndrome

Is your life in chaos where you can’t have anyone over to your house?
There are times when I look around my home and see clutter.  At times I get motivated and clean like a mad woman.  Other times I feel overwhelmed and close my eyes to the clutter, especially, if I am carving out time to write.
Thank the powers that be for Marla!  She teaches folks how to FLY (Finally Loving Yourself).
In her daily email titled “Morning Musing: It’s My Birthday,”  Marla lists 62 lessons she has learned during her life. While the lessons are in no particular order, the first one listed is “It is OK to be sidetracked because sometimes the path you take brings you out into the most wonderful places.”  And the last one listed is, “Patience doesn’t cost a dime but the benefits are worth more than gold!”
If you want to get out from under clutter, whether it be in your home or your life, Marla, the FlyLady, can help you do that.
Yes, she has helped me with my home, my 40 hour work week office, and my spare time for hobbies, etc.

 

 

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That Mouse Can Fly

That Mouse Can Fly
Author: Kim Holley
Publisher: Rowe Publishing
Publication Date: 30 June 2017 (ages 5 and up)
Genre: Children’s Illustrated/Imagination
Price: Paperback: $14.00
Available at:
About the Book: 
An adventurous and imaginative little boy spends the summer on his Grandparents’ farm. During a treasure hunting expedition, his mind takes over when his boots get stuck in the mud and he sees something fly past him that looks just like a beady-eyed furry little mouse. He begins to wonder, if it really was a mouse, and just where he has traveled?

Author Bio:
Kim Holley is the author of these additional children’s books: Rollie Pollie ReviewA Fish WishI Love Gloves, andMurphie and the Meerkat. Kim was born in Kansas City, Missouri, and currently lives in rural southeast Kansas. She has been writing personalized poetry for her family and friends for over 30 years. Kim began writing children’s short stories based on her grandchildren’s adventures as well as stories she’s developed on her own. 
connect with the publisher:

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Holiday Book Gift Guide

A while back I put out a call to authors to be included in a Holiday Book Gift Guide that I was creating.

WOW! What a turn out.

I really did not expect too many to participate, but am so happy they did.

You can view the Holiday Book Gift Guide here:

Be sure to take some time to visit all the authors who participated.  Some have special sales going on until December 31.  Others are offering free chapter samples and others, if you sign up for their newsletter, will give a free copy of one of their books.

I ask everyone who is reading this post to please share on your social media sites.

Note-authors were NOT charged a fee to participate in the gift guide.  This was FREE for all who participated.  And if everyone promotes this guide, the cross-promotion has a huge wide potential.

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Filed under Authors, Biography, Books, Children's Books, Coming of Age, Crime Fiction, Dark Fantasy Romance, e-books, Fantasy, Fiction, Genre, Historical Fiction, Historical Romance, Holidays, Inspirational, Memoir, Mystery, Paranormal, Paranormal Fantasy Romance, Paranormal Romance, poetry, Romance, science fiction, Suspense, Thriller