Category Archives: Writing

14 Trendy Words

Have you ever noticed how certain words become a trend?

I started noticing when a person I know announced on Facebook that they were pansexual.

I thought my vocabulary was fairly extensive, but I have to admit, I don’t recall hearing that word before, so I looked it up.

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary pansexual means “of, relating to, or characterized by sexual desire or attraction that is not limited to people of a particular gender identity or sexual orientation.”  Meaning a pansexual person is attracted to all kinds of people-males, females, transgender, and those who identify as non-binary (neither- male or female).

Words, ar like other things.  As one person told me, “you never see a yellow car on the road until you buy one, then you see them everywhere.”  Did the color yellow become trendy as a vehicle color, or did the person just never noticed the color before?

Here is a list of words that I have noticed in the past few months that I hadn’t noticed for a very long time.

 

Blowhard

Calumny

Candor

Charlatan

Collusion

Debased

Dotard

Hegemon

Imbroglio

Oligarchs

Redaction

Sesquipedalian

Svengali

Zealot

 

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Friday Musings – Hit by a Tornado

Here it is, Friday, May 11.  The month started out stormy in my area on May 1.  Weather stations were saying the weather was to be worse on May 2 and for me it was!

We arrived home shortly after 5 p.m.  It was sprinkling with rain outside.  Hubby parked the car in the garage and said he was going to get his raincoat and take the dogs for a walk.  He proceeded to put on his raincoat and I went into the house to turn on the television to see what the weather person was reporting for the evening.

I turned on the TV and the weather person stated, “if you are in this area,” he pointed to the map on the screen, “take cover now.”  It wasn’t our area!

As soon as he said that our power went out and BAM we were hit by a tornado!

The sky was not dark.  It was a mixture of white, pale yellow, and light gray.  You could still see the sun shining, yet we were enveloped in this weird color mist.

Some have said that a tornado sounds like a train.  It did not sound that way to me.  It sounded like something I have never heard before mixed with howling wind and pounding rain.

I told the cats to follow me and headed to the basement.  Our basement is finished and we designated the back bedroom and closet area as the safest place in the house.

Hubby came in from the garage and said that as soon as he got a short distance from the house it hit and now he was drenched to the bone.

One of the cats, Abby, was terrified.  She sat on the stairs moaning.  Hubby picked her up and brought her into the bedroom and placed her on the bed.

Another cat, Rogue, had followed me down the stairs and was under the bed.

Our third cat, Bates, stayed upstairs.  I imagined him sitting on a stool looking out the window.  He likes to do that.

The howling wind lasted about thirty minutes.  The rain, much longer.

Once the rain let up, Hubby walked down the road to see the damage.  A power pole was down and a power line had snapped.  Trees were down on the road, lots of tree damage on our property, tin missing from the barn roof, the barn was now leaning, tin was missing from the blacksmith shop, top of the dog kennel was missing, and the chicken coop was turned over with chickens inside-all alive.

It was a miracle.  No damage to the house.

Throughout the neighborhood, we learned that no homes were damaged.  Damage was done to outbuildings and trees.  One neighbor lost their hay barn, another lost their horse barn-all horses survived, and another lost their children’s playset.

Hubby said it was like the tornado had been picky about what it wanted to hit.

It could have been worse and we are thankful that it wasn’t.

 

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Proofreading Thursday – Spelling Variations

Since I have been taking/working on this proofreading course, I find that I proofread everything I read.

When I told a friend that I found myself proofreading instead of just reading for the pleasure of it they asked if I found any mistakes in the current book I am reading.

The answer, “Yes.”  And this book was traditionally published.  I know that things get missed, they did in my book.  No one is perfect.

It is very hard to proofread your own work.

An article I read about proofreading said you really needed a good editor.  In class, we learned that proofreading is not editing.

When you are proofreading, keep in mind who wrote the work.  Where is the author from?  The United States, United Kingdom, or somewhere else.  It matters when it comes to spelling certain words.

 

Here are some examples of American spelling vs British spelling:

Checkbook/Chequebook

Colorful/Colourful 

Flavor/Flavour

Encyclopedia/Encyclopaedia

Familiarize/Familiarise

Jewelry/Jewellery

Licensing/Licencing

Mustache/Moustache

 

 

 

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Looking for Authors to Interview

I hope those who read this blog post today will share with all your author friends.

I am looking for authors to interview in order to help them promote their books.

If you are interested, please contact me at cyannris at gmail dot com.

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Copyright Basic Tutorial

When you have questions about copyright, it might seem confusing when you do a Google search or search Copyright.gov.

Here is a Copyright Basic Tutorial, I think might be helpful for those beginning to ask questions about copyright.

·         Why does copyright protection exist?

·         Whose work is protected by copyright?

·         What can copyright holders do with their copyrights?

·         Which works can be protected by copyright?

·         When is a work protected by copyright?

·         Where are copyrighted works protected?

This tutorial takes about 30 minutes to complete and is appropriate for anyone just starting to asking questions about copyrights or if you need a copyrights refresher lesson.

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Wrong Words

As I mentioned in a previous blog post, I signed up for a proofreading class.  Another aspect of proofreading is the commonly misused words.

Can you pick the correct words for this sentence?

The butler gave Miss Marple a written confession, hoping to lessen/lesson his guilty conscious/conscience.

If you picked “lessen” and “conscience” you chose correctly.

 Give this sentence a try.

If they had taken Hercule Poirot’s advise/advice, the police would have apprehended the suspect a lot/alot faster.

Correct words are “advice” and “a lot.”

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Is that a family name?

“What is your name?” someone asked me.

“Cynthia,” I replied.

“Is that a family name?” they asked.

Well, yes and no.

Yes, there is a Cynthia in my ancestral line, but I was not named after that “Cynthia.”

Several years ago, when I started doing family genealogy, I asked mom if I was named after a family ancestor.

“No,” she said.

“Where did you get the name, Cynthia, from,?” I asked.

Mom laughed and told me this story.

“When your Dad and I were at the grocery store, Mr. Stewart asked if we had a name picked out.  We didn’t, so he suggested that for a baby girl her name be Cynthia Ann, after his mother.”

Yes, my parents went shopping at a grocery store and came away with a name for a baby girl.

I know, I know!  People go shopping at a grocery store for many things, but a name is not usually one of them.

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Can you proofread your own work?

I thought that proofreading was pretty easy because I am pretty good at it.

Proofreading is not easy!

I found this out when I signed up for a proofreading class.  Oh, I can catch nearly all of the typographical errors, but when it comes to hyphens and semicolons, I found that I am not as good as I thought.

Can you place the hyphens in this sentence correctly?

The five by eight foot rug seemed ordinary – until it slowly started lifting from the ground.

Answer Key:

The five-by-eight-foot rug seemed ordinary – until is slowly started lifting from the ground.  (Chicago Manual of Style, 7.88)

 

 

Can you place the commas and semicolons correctly?

Some important dates for Americans to know are July 4 1776 May 10 1896 July 20 1969 and July 6 1928.

Answer Key:

Some important dates for Americans to know are July 4, 1776; May 10, 1896; July 20, 1969; and July 6, 1928.  (Chicago Manual of Style, 6.60, 6.38)

 

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Brief Timeline of Printing 1970-2011

This is a continuation of the Brief Timeline that began on January 26, 2018, that continued on February 2, 2018, and this is the last blog on the timeline of printing.

1970: Water-based ink introduced.

1972: Thermal printing developed.

1977: The Compugraphic EditWriter 7500 phototypesetter introduced.

1981: Microsoft Disk Operating System introduced.

1982: Adobe Systems Inc. founded.

1983: Desktop publishing appears.

1984: Apple Macintosh personal computer introduced.

1984: 3D printing developed.

1985: Microsoft Windows introduced.

1985: PostScript typesetting language introduced.

1985: Apple LaserWriter desktop printer introduced.

1985: PageMaker desktop publishing introduced.

1987: Soy-based ink appears.

1987: QuarkXPress desktop publishing program introduced.

1988: Adobe Photoshop raster graphics editor introduced.

1990: Xerox DocuTech. Production-publishing system that allowed paper documents to be scanned, electronically edited, and then printed on demand.

1991: TrueType scalable computer introduced.

1991: Heidelberg and Presstek introduced GTO-DI, the first plate making on the press.

1993: Indigo digital color printer introduced.

1993: Portable Document Format (PDF) introduced.

1996: OpenType scalable computer fonts introduced.

1999: InDesign desktop publishing program introduced.

2011: The Saint John’s Bible is the first completely handwritten and illustrated Bible since the invention of the printing press.

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Ancient Wisdom

Yesterday was my birthday.  I don’t feel old.  I have Ancient Wisdom!

Our son turned 39 last month if that gives you any indication of how old I am.

I work with college students.  They are 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22-year-olds.  They are young.  They walk around with things called earbuds in their ears.

I have to wonder if they are aware of their surroundings, if they are damaging their hearing, and if they are listening to anything worthwhile.  Well, the listening part might make them happy, smile, or laugh.  Hopefully, they aren’t listening to anything that will make them angry.

While they wear earbuds, I wear a hearing aid.  While they dye their hair various colors, I watch my turn grayer by each passing day.

 

They are full of youthful energy and dreams.

But, alas!  I am full of WISDOM!

Those young folks have nothing on me.  Even though I feel ancient compared to them, I have “been there, done that.”  I have traveled the world and lived in a foreign country.  I have seen more births and death than they can ever imagine.

I wonder if any of them have ever read the classics or would they know anything about J. D. Salinger, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, James Joyce, or Jack London.

Then again, they may wonder if I know anything about Game of Thrones, Star Wars, Here and Now, or Silicon Valley.

I do have to admit that some of the things the young folks watch on television, Netflix, etc., is not my cup of tea.

But no matter.  I know how to fill out a loan application, file my taxes, fill out a census form, buy a vehicle, renew my drivers license, apply for a passport, request copies of birth, marriage, divorce, and death records.

I know how to do laundry, cook, and sew on a button.  Yes, these are things that college students have asked me over the years to teach them because they didn’t want their mothers knowing they couldn’t do it.

And, I know how to read cursive hand writing.  Yes, I have had to teach college students how to read cursive hand writing so they could do their job.

I could ramble on, but for now, I will stop this blog post and say…I am truly happy to be considered by some as the little old woman (who is going gray) who is ANCIENT.

 

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